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There is a growing body of scientific evidence that the health of the microbiome (the trillions of microbes that inhabit the human host) plays an important role in maintaining the

There is a growing body of scientific evidence that the health of the microbiome (the trillions of microbes that inhabit the human host) plays an important role in maintaining the health of the host and that disruptions in the microbiome may play a role in certain disease processes. An increasing number of research studies have provided evidence that the composition of the gut (enteric) microbiome (GM) in at least a subset of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) deviates from what is usually observed in typically developing individuals.

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    Date Created
    • 2015-05-07
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3402/mehd.v26.26878
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      0891-060X
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1651-2235
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    Frye, R. E., Slattery, J., Macfabe, D. F., Allen-Vercoe, E., Parker, W., Rodakis, J., . . . Midtvedt, T. (2015). Approaches to studying and manipulating the enteric microbiome to improve autism symptoms. Microbial Ecology in Health & Disease, 26(0). doi:10.3402/mehd.v26.26878

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