Description

This study aimed to ascertain and measure the effect of news media on the public perception of crime scene investigation. Experimental subjects participated in a survey that collected relative demographic

This study aimed to ascertain and measure the effect of news media on the public perception of crime scene investigation. Experimental subjects participated in a survey that collected relative demographic information, media habits, knowledge of crime scene investigation techniques, and relative accuracy of forensic science. The subjects were then exposed to excerpts of news media that diminished accuracy of DNA analysis and blood spatter analysis techniques, after which subjects answered questions about their opinions of crime scene investigation procedures after reading the materials presented. A total of 258 subjects were surveyed, after which data was compiled and analyzed using Chi-squared test as well as the McNemar test. Experimental data found that 52% of all respondents that participated in the survey had their opinions changed regarding the accuracy of crime scene investigation procedures following exposure to media. Further analysis of the data found that respondents in the 18-24 age demographic were significantly more likely to have their opinions changed following exposure to media as well as respondents with less education (defined as having earned less than an undergraduate degree). There was also significance found for the relationship between the amount of time spent per week watching CSI/Law Enforcement programs and opinions changed following exposure to media as well as the relationship between the amount of time spent per week viewing local news programs and opinions changed following exposure to media. Finally, there was significance found for the relationship between the time spent per week visiting social media sites and opinions changed following exposure to media.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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