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People have become increasingly perceptive in their health and well being. As a result, people are directing their attention to unconventional diet choices. A number of individuals are turning to

People have become increasingly perceptive in their health and well being. As a result, people are directing their attention to unconventional diet choices. A number of individuals are turning to a veganism. In 2017, six percent of Americans identified as vegan, up from only one percent in 2014. A vegan diet has been scientifically shown to have many health benefits when compared to the average western diet, which is typically inadequate in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and contains excessive amounts of processed foods, alcohol, salt, red meat, and sugar. With its gain in popularity, and more people adopting the diet, comes a lot of controversies. There are many who support and advocate for it, including a number of celebrities, and health organizations like the American Diabetes Association and USDA. However, many people remain skeptical about its purpose and proposed benefits. There is a general lack of knowledge when it comes to veganism. The purpose of this study was to assess the attitudes and beliefs held by college students at Arizona State University about a vegan diet. A survey was prepared and later distributed to students of different majors across Arizona State University. A total of 100 students completed the survey. The results revealed that ASU students had varying beliefs in regard to a vegan diet, some accurate beliefs, and other inaccurate beliefs. In general, the vegan participants tend to be more accurate in their knowledge of a vegan diet, however, no statistical differences were found among the vegan and non-vegan (includes vegetarian, pescatarian and omnivorous) participants. Supplemental research should include a larger sample of vegan participants and should examine behavioral differences among vegans and non-vegans.

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