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The engineers of the future are currently in the process of earning their degrees and certifications from engineering programs guided by ABET accreditations. ABET, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and

The engineers of the future are currently in the process of earning their degrees and certifications from engineering programs guided by ABET accreditations. ABET, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, is the voice of reason for the development of engineering programs. Aspiring engineers desire institutions that follow ABET Standards to ensure that their education meets the expectations of industry partners and researchers. However, these standards have not been drastically altered in years to reflect the changing needs of industry. With the advancement of technology in the last two decades, old school engineering and its application is becoming less common.

Science policy and curriculum go hand in. The future engineers are taught hand calculations, lab testing for field work parallels, and methodologies based on the written policies set forth decades ago. Technology today is rapidly changing, and engineering education is struggling to make changes to keep up with these technology advancements. In today’s world, technology drives invention and innovation, whereas some argue it is thought and curiosity. Engineering programs are taking a toll regardless of the point of view. Education is not made to keep up with current societal needs.

This paper a provides an overview of the history of engineering, curriculum standards for engineering programs, an analysis of engineering programs at top universities and large universities alongside student experiences available to engineers. The ideas offered are no means the exact solution; rather policymakers and STEM education stakeholder may find the ideas shared helpful and use them as a catalyst for change.

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