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Many ants rely on both visual cues and self-generated chemical signals for navigation, but their relative importance varies across species and context. We evaluated the roles of both modalities during

Many ants rely on both visual cues and self-generated chemical signals for navigation, but their relative importance varies across species and context. We evaluated the roles of both modalities during colony emigration by Temnothorax rugatulus. Colonies were induced to move from an old nest in the center of an arena to a new nest at the arena edge. In the midst of the emigration the arena floor was rotated 60 degrees around the old nest entrance, thus displacing any substrate-bound odor cues while leaving visual cues unchanged.

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    Date Created
    • 2013-08-30
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1371/journal.pone.0064367
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1045-3830
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1939-1560
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    Bowens SR, Glatt DP, Pratt SC (2013) Visual Navigation during Colony Emigration by the Ant Temnothorax rugatulus. PLoS ONE 8(5): e64367. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064367

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