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The conscientious are morally conflicted when their moral dilemmas or incommensurabilities, real or apparent, have not been resolved. But such doublemindedness need not lead to ethical disintegration or moral insensitivity.

The conscientious are morally conflicted when their moral dilemmas or incommensurabilities, real or apparent, have not been resolved. But such doublemindedness need not lead to ethical disintegration or moral insensitivity. For one may develop the moral virtue of doublemindedness, the settled power to deliberate and act well while morally conflicted. Such action will be accompanied by both moral loss (perhaps 'dirty hands') and ethical gain (salubrious agental stability).

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Date Created
  • 2013-10-28
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1017/S0031819113000077
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      0031-8191
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1469-817X
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    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Donald Beggs (2013). The Moral Virtue of Doublemindedness. Philosophy, 88, pp 411-432. doi:10.1017/S0031819113000077.

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