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Our species exhibits spectacular success due to cumulative culture. While cognitive evolution of social learning mechanisms may be partially responsible for adaptive human culture, features of early human social structure

Our species exhibits spectacular success due to cumulative culture. While cognitive evolution of social learning mechanisms may be partially responsible for adaptive human culture, features of early human social structure may also play a role by increasing the number potential models from which to learn innovations. We present interview data on interactions between same-sex adult dyads of Ache and Hadza hunter-gatherers living in multiple distinct residential bands (20 Ache bands; 42 Hadza bands; 1201 dyads) throughout a tribal home range.

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    • 2014-07-21
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    Hill KR, Wood BM, Baggio J, Hurtado AM, Boyd RT (2014) Hunter-Gatherer Inter-Band Interaction Rates: Implications for Cumulative Culture. PLoS ONE 9(7): e102806. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102806

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