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Transactional theories support that parent-child processes are best studied in conjunction with one another, addressing their reciprocal influence and change across time. This study tested a longitudinal, autoregressive model exploring

Transactional theories support that parent-child processes are best studied in conjunction with one another, addressing their reciprocal influence and change across time. This study tested a longitudinal, autoregressive model exploring bidirectional relations among maternal symptomatology, child internalizing/externalizing symptoms, and maternal sensitivity during the preschool period (child ages 3 to 5 years), comparing relations among families of typically developing children and children with developmental risk.

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Date Created
  • 2014-09-01
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1080/15374416.2013.812038
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1537-4416
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1537-4424
    Note
    • This is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published as Ciciolla, Lucia, Gerstein, Emily D., & Crnic, Keith A. (2014). Reciprocity Among Maternal Distress, Child Behavior, and Parenting: Transactional Processes and Early Childhood Risk. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY, 43(5), 751-764. DOI: 10.1080/15374416.2013.812038. Copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15374416.2013.812038, opens in a new window

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    Ciciolla, Lucia, Gerstein, Emily D., & Crnic, Keith A. (2014). Reciprocity Among Maternal Distress, Child Behavior, and Parenting: Transactional Processes and Early Childhood Risk. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY, 43(5), 751-764. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2013.812038

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