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Simons and Burt's (2011) social schematic theory (SST) of crime posits that adverse social factors are associated with offending because they promote a set of social schemas (i.e., a criminogenic

Simons and Burt's (2011) social schematic theory (SST) of crime posits that adverse social factors are associated with offending because they promote a set of social schemas (i.e., a criminogenic knowledge structure) that elevates the probability of situational definitions favorable to crime. This study extends the SST model by incorporating the role of contexts for action. Furthermore, the study advances tests of the SST by incorporating a measure of criminogenic situational definitions to assess whether such definitions mediate the effects of schemas and contexts on crime.

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Date Created
  • 2014-11-01
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1111/1745-9125.12053
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1745- 9125
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    Simons, Ronald L., Burt, Callie H., Barr, Ashley B., Lei, Man-Kit, & Stewart, Eric (2014). INCORPORATING ROUTINE ACTIVITIES, ACTIVITY SPACES, AND SITUATIONAL DEFINITIONS INTO THE SOCIAL SCHEMATIC THEORY OF CRIME. CRIMINOLOGY, 52(4), 655-687. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-9125.12053

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