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Adaptation requires genetic variation, but founder populations are generally genetically depleted. Here we sequence two populations of an inbred ant that diverge in phenotype to determine how variability is generated.

Adaptation requires genetic variation, but founder populations are generally genetically depleted. Here we sequence two populations of an inbred ant that diverge in phenotype to determine how variability is generated. Cardiocondyla obscurior has the smallest of the sequenced ant genomes and its structure suggests a fundamental role of transposable elements (TEs) in adaptive evolution. Accumulations of TEs (TE islands) comprising 7.18% of the genome evolve faster than other regions with regard to single-nucleotide variants, gene/exon duplications and deletions and gene homology.

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    Date Created
    • 2014-12-01
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1038/ncomms6495
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2041-1723

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    Schrader, Lukas, Kim, Jay W., Ence, Daniel, Zimin, Aleksey, Klein, Antonia, Wyschetzki, Katharina, Weichselgartner, Tobias, Kemena, Carsten, Stoekl, Johannes, Schultner, Eva, Wurm, Yannick, Smith, Christopher D., Yandell, Mark, Heinze, Juergen, Gadau, Juergen, & Oettler, Jan (2014). Transposable element islands facilitate adaptation to novel environments in an invasive species. NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, 5495. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms6495

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