Description

Portrayals of the US Southwest's Native American inhabitants as “primitive” relics have been shaped by the intertwining practices of archaeological collection and museum display. Focusing on the Pueblo Grande Museum

Portrayals of the US Southwest's Native American inhabitants as “primitive” relics have been shaped by the intertwining practices of archaeological collection and museum display. Focusing on the Pueblo Grande Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, this essay analyzes the interpellation of museum visitors as citizen archaeologists, a process that re/produces racialized discourses through rhetorics of science and time. It is argued that as visitors excavate remnants of the past they engage an archaeological vision that reinforces dominant constructions of “modern” citizenship.

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Date Created
  • 2015-06-01
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1080/14791420.2015.1012214
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1479-1420
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1479-4233
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    Chevrette, Roberta, & Hess, Aaron (2015). Unearthing the Native Past: Citizen Archaeology and Modern (Non) Belonging at the Pueblo Grande Museum. COMMUNICATION AND CRITICAL-CULTURAL STUDIES, 12(2), 139-158. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14791420.2015.1012214

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