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Chronic high fat feeding is correlated with diabetes and kidney disease. However, the impact of short-term high fat diets (HFD) is not well-understood. Six weeks of HFD result in indices

Chronic high fat feeding is correlated with diabetes and kidney disease. However, the impact of short-term high fat diets (HFD) is not well-understood. Six weeks of HFD result in indices of metabolic syndrome (increased adiposity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation) compared to rats fed on standard chow. The hypothesis was that short-term HFD would induce early signs of renal disease. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either HFD (60% fat) or standard chow (5% fat) for six weeks.

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    Date Created
    • 2015-06-09
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1155/2015/157520
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2090-0724
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2090-0732

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    Crinigan, C., Calhoun, M., & Sweazea, K. L. (2015). Short-Term High Fat Intake Does Not Significantly Alter Markers of Renal Function or Inflammation in Young Male Sprague-Dawley Rats. Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, 2015, 1-9. doi:10.1155/2015/157520

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