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Increasing levels of financial inequality prompt questions about the relationship between income and well-being. Using a twins sample from the Survey of Midlife Development in the U. S. and controlling for personality as core self-evaluations (CSE), we found that men,

Increasing levels of financial inequality prompt questions about the relationship between income and well-being. Using a twins sample from the Survey of Midlife Development in the U. S. and controlling for personality as core self-evaluations (CSE), we found that men, but not women, had higher subjective financial well-being (SFWB) when they had higher incomes.

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    Date Created
    2015-09-29
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01493
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1664-1078

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    Zyphur, M. J., Li, W., Zhang, Z., Arvey, R. D., & Barsky, A. P. (2015). Income, personality, and subjective financial well-being: the role of gender in their genetic and environmental relationships. Frontiers in Psychology, 6. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01493

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