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Dominance hierarchies are widespread in animal social groups and often have measureable effects on individual health and reproductive success. Dominance ranks are not static individual attributes, however, but instead are

Dominance hierarchies are widespread in animal social groups and often have measureable effects on individual health and reproductive success. Dominance ranks are not static individual attributes, however, but instead are influenced by two independent processes: 1) changes in hierarchy membership and 2) successful challenges of higher-ranking individuals. Understanding which of these processes dominates the dynamics of rank trajectories can provide insights into fitness benefits of within-sex competition.

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    Date Created
    • 2016-10-14
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1038/srep35404
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2045-2322
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    Foerster, S., Franz, M., Murray, C. M., Gilby, I. C., Feldblum, J. T., Walker, K. K., & Pusey, A. E. (2016). Chimpanzee females queue but males compete for social status. Scientific Reports, 6(1). doi:10.1038/srep35404

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