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Human occupation is usually associated with degraded landscapes but 13,000 years of repeated occupation by British Columbia’s coastal First Nations has had the opposite effect, enhancing temperate rainforest productivity. This

Human occupation is usually associated with degraded landscapes but 13,000 years of repeated occupation by British Columbia’s coastal First Nations has had the opposite effect, enhancing temperate rainforest productivity. This is particularly the case over the last 6,000 years when intensified intertidal shellfish usage resulted in the accumulation of substantial shell middens. We show that soils at habitation sites are higher in calcium and phosphorous. Both of these are limiting factors in coastal temperate rainforests.

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    Date Created
    • 2016-08-30
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1038/ncomms12491
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2041-1723
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    Trant, A. J., Nijland, W., Hoffman, K. M., Mathews, D. L., Mclaren, D., Nelson, T. A., & Starzomski, B. M. (2016). Intertidal resource use over millennia enhances forest productivity. Nature Communications, 7, 12491. doi:10.1038/ncomms12491

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