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Although parasitic organisms are found worldwide, the relative importance of host specificity and geographic isolation for parasite speciation has been explored in only a few systems. Here, we study Plasmodium

Although parasitic organisms are found worldwide, the relative importance of host specificity and geographic isolation for parasite speciation has been explored in only a few systems. Here, we study Plasmodium parasites known to infect Asian nonhuman primates, a monophyletic group that includes the lineage leading to the human parasite Plasmodium vivax and several species used as laboratory models in malaria research.

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    Date Created
    • 2014-11-10
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1093/molbev/msu310
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1537-1719
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      0737-4038
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    Muehlenbein, M. P., Pacheco, M. A., Taylor, J. E., Prall, S. P., Ambu, L., Nathan, S., . . . Escalante, A. A. (2014). Accelerated Diversification of Nonhuman Primate Malarias in Southeast Asia: Adaptive Radiation or Geographic Speciation? Molecular Biology and Evolution, 32(2), 422-439. doi:10.1093/molbev/msu310

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