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Eusocial insects, mostly Hymenoptera, have evolved unique colonial lifestyles that rely on the perception of social context mainly through pheromones, and chemoreceptors are hypothesized to have played important adaptive roles

Eusocial insects, mostly Hymenoptera, have evolved unique colonial lifestyles that rely on the perception of social context mainly through pheromones, and chemoreceptors are hypothesized to have played important adaptive roles in the evolution of sociality. However, because chemoreceptor repertoires have been characterized in few social insects and their solitary relatives, a comprehensive examination of this hypothesis has not been possible.

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    Date Created
    • 2015-08-12
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1093/gbe/evv149
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1759-6653
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    Zhou, X., Rokas, A., Berger, S. L., Liebig, J., Ray, A., & Zwiebel, L. J. (2015). Chemoreceptor Evolution in Hymenoptera and Its Implications for the Evolution of Eusociality. Genome Biology and Evolution, 7(8), 2407-2416. doi:10.1093/gbe/evv149

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