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Ecosystems transition quickly in the Anthropocene, whereas biodiversity adapts more slowly. Here we simulated a shifting woodland ecosystem on the Colorado Plateau of western North America by using as its

Ecosystems transition quickly in the Anthropocene, whereas biodiversity adapts more slowly. Here we simulated a shifting woodland ecosystem on the Colorado Plateau of western North America by using as its proxy over space and time the fundamental niche of the Arizona black rattlesnake (Crotalus cerberus). We found an expansive (= end-of-Pleistocene) range that contracted sharply (= present), but is blocked topographically by Grand Canyon/Colorado River as it shifts predictably northwestward under moderate climate change (= 2080).

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    Date Created
    • 2016-04-27
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1098/rsos.160047
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2054-5703
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    Douglas, M. R., Davis, M. A., Amarello, M., Smith, J. J., Schuett, G. W., Herrmann, H., . . . Douglas, M. E. (2016). Anthropogenic impacts drive niche and conservation metrics of a cryptic rattlesnake on the Colorado Plateau of western North America. Royal Society Open Science, 3(4), 160047. doi:10.1098/rsos.160047

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