Description

Human populations differ reliably in the degree to which people favor family, friends, and community members over strangers and outsiders. In the last decade, researchers have begun to propose several

Human populations differ reliably in the degree to which people favor family, friends, and community members over strangers and outsiders. In the last decade, researchers have begun to propose several economic and evolutionary hypotheses for these cross-population differences in parochialism. In this paper, we outline major current theories and review recent attempts to test them. We also discuss the key methodological challenges in assessing these diverse economic and evolutionary theories for cross-population differences in parochialism.

Reuse Permissions
  • application/pdf

    Download count: 0

    Details

    Contributors
    Date Created
    • 2013-09-11
    Resource Type
  • Text
  • Collections this item is in
    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00559
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1662-5161

    Citation and reuse

    Cite this item

    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Hruschka, D. J., & Henrich, J. (2013). Economic and evolutionary hypotheses for cross-population variation in parochialism. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 7. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2013.00559

    Machine-readable links