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A central question in cognitive neuroscience is how unitary, coherent decisions at the whole organism level can arise from the distributed behavior of a large population of neurons with only

A central question in cognitive neuroscience is how unitary, coherent decisions at the whole organism level can arise from the distributed behavior of a large population of neurons with only partially overlapping information. We address this issue by studying neural spiking behavior recorded from a multielectrode array with 169 channels during a visual motion direction discrimination task. It is well known that in this task there are two distinct phases in neural spiking behavior.

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    Date Created
    • 2017-06-06
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  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3389/fnins.2017.00313
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1662-4548
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1662-453X

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    Daniels, B. C., Flack, J. C., & Krakauer, D. C. (2017). Dual Coding Theory Explains Biphasic Collective Computation in Neural Decision-Making. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 11. doi:10.3389/fnins.2017.00313

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