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As many as 20–55% of patients with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) experience chronic endocrine dysfunction, leading to impaired quality of life, impaired rehabilitation efforts and lowered life

As many as 20–55% of patients with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) experience chronic endocrine dysfunction, leading to impaired quality of life, impaired rehabilitation efforts and lowered life expectancy. Endocrine dysfunction after TBI is thought to result from acceleration–deceleration forces to the brain within the skull, creating enduring hypothalamic and pituitary neuropathology, and subsequent hypothalamic–pituitary endocrine (HPE) dysfunction.

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    Date Created
    • 2016
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1530/EC-16-0031
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      2049-3614
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    Rowe, R. K., Rumney, B. M., May, H. G., Permana, P., Adelson, P. D., Harman, S. M., . . . Thomas, T. C. (2016). Diffuse traumatic brain injury affects chronic corticosterone function in the rat. Endocrine Connections, 5(4), 152-166. doi:10.1530/ec-16-0031

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