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Antiviral resistance in influenza is rampant and has the possibility of causing major morbidity and mortality. Previous models have identified treatment regimes to minimize total infections and keep resistance low.

Antiviral resistance in influenza is rampant and has the possibility of causing major morbidity and mortality. Previous models have identified treatment regimes to minimize total infections and keep resistance low. However, the bulk of these studies have ignored stochasticity and heterogeneous contact structures. Here we develop a network model of influenza transmission with treatment and resistance, and present both standard mean-field approximations as well as simulated dynamics.

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    Date Created
    • 2013-02-07
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002912
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1553-734X
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1553-7358

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    Althouse, B. M., Patterson-Lomba, O., Goerg, G. M., & Hébert-Dufresne, L. (2013). The Timing and Targeting of Treatment in Influenza Pandemics Influences the Emergence of Resistance in Structured Populations. PLoS Computational Biology, 9(2). doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002912

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