Description

In the visual domain, a stationary object that is difficult to detect usually becomes far more salient if it moves while the objects around it do not. This “pop out”

In the visual domain, a stationary object that is difficult to detect usually becomes far more salient if it moves while the objects around it do not. This “pop out” effect is important for parsing the visual world into figure/ground relationships that allow creatures to detect food, threats, etc. We tested for an auditory correlate to this visual effect by asking listeners to identify a single word, spoken by a female, embedded with two or four masking words spoken by males.

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    Contributors
    Date Created
    • 2017-12-20
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02238
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1664-1078

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    Pastore, M. T., & Yost, W. A. (2017). Spatial Release from Masking with a Moving Target. Frontiers in Psychology, 8. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02238

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