A collection of scholarly and professional work created by Kevin Pardon. Kevin is a Health Sciences Librarian at Arizona State University.

Collaborating Institutions:
ASU Library
Displaying 1 - 10 of 15
369-Thumbnail Image.png

Development and Implementation of Library Modules in a 100% Online Nursing Program

Description

Objectives: With more and more of our students enrolling in online degree programs and attending class virtually we as librarians must ensure that we are providing the same level of education, content, and service to these online students as we

Objectives: With more and more of our students enrolling in online degree programs and attending class virtually we as librarians must ensure that we are providing the same level of education, content, and service to these online students as we do to our in-person students. This poster will describe the development and implementation of multiple library modules across a 100% online RN-BSN nursing program at a large public institution.

Methods: The librarian met with and worked with instructors across three courses in the online RN-BSN program to discuss and examine current library content and instruction that already existed in these classes, as well as the need for new content and modules. An instructional scaffolding approach was settled on, where new content would be introduced progressively to students over the course of three semesters in three separate consecutive courses. In previous semesters, many faculty simply chose their own library content, linked only to the general tutorials page, or lacked any library content at all, making a new structured approach even more necessary. This poster will describe the development of these library modules in more detail, including software used and best practices, and will also focus on the implementation and lessons learned.

Results: A total of five new modules were implemented in the first two classes, while current library tutorials were kept in the third class in the sequence. The modules focused on teaching the students information literacy and database searching skills.

Conclusion: Sequencing library modules over the course of multiple semesters allowed students to build upon core knowledge that is necessary to successfully complete increasingly advanced assignments and gain research skills that can be applied in their future careers as nurses.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05-28

370-Thumbnail Image.png

Does the Library Have this Book? Evaluating Our Patron Driven Acquisitions Plan for Nursing

Description

Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) is a growing method of collection development in academic libraries that follows a Just-In-Time model versus the more traditional Just-In-Case model. Arizona State University (ASU) implemented our current PDA plan and profiles in 2009 with minimal

Patron Driven Acquisition (PDA) is a growing method of collection development in academic libraries that follows a Just-In-Time model versus the more traditional Just-In-Case model. Arizona State University (ASU) implemented our current PDA plan and profiles in 2009 with minimal changes occurring since this initial implementation date. Our PDA model of collection development involves purchasing print and e-books when users select them in the online catalog, rather than receiving items on an approval plan or by librarian selection. After an initial investigation concluded that several major health sciences publications had not been loaded into the catalog for potential patron selection, we began a more thorough examination of our PDA profile.

ASU serves over 6,500 students, faculty, and staff in Nursing and Allied Health fields in a range of programs requiring a robust collection. This poster details the process we used to determine whether the profiles created by previous librarians in 2009 have succeeded in uploading records for publications that appear on the 2014 nursing texts from Doody’s Core Titles into our catalog. Specifically, our poster will present on the number of Doody’s titles that were excluded from the PDA plan due to our profile settings and analyze why these titles were excluded. Our findings will allow us to order titles that are currently missing from our collection as well as tailor our PDA profiles to include key texts in nursing and allied health subjects in the future. We will also provide recommendations and considerations for other libraries considering or using a PDA model for purchasing texts in the health sciences.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2016-01-05

376-Thumbnail Image.png

Who's Doing Systematic Reviews?: A Descriptive Analysis

Description

Background & Objective:
Over the past several decades, systematic reviews have become a major part of the biomedical research literature landscape. While systematic reviews were originally developed for medicine and its related fields, they are now published in other disciplines.

Background & Objective:
Over the past several decades, systematic reviews have become a major part of the biomedical research literature landscape. While systematic reviews were originally developed for medicine and its related fields, they are now published in other disciplines. Our initial goal was to broadly investigate and describe the non-health sciences subject areas and disciplines that are publishing systematic reviews. Specifically, our research questions were,“What disciplines outside of the health sciences are adopting systematic reviews as a research method?” and “What implications may this have for health sciences librarianship?” Based on our initial findings, we will propose avenues for future research.

Methods & Discussion:
We conducted a search in the Scopus database to serve as a representative sample of the research literature. We searched for the phrase “systematic review*” in the article title or abstract, and limited the results to review articles from journals. We filtered out articles published in health sciences disciplines using the Scopus subject categories, and examined the articles that remained. The resulting set of titles was screened by two independent reviewers in a stepwise fashion. First we read the titles, then the abstracts, then the full text of remaining articles to determine if each was a systematic review and addressed a topic outside of the health sciences. We reconciled any differences for citations on which there was not initial consensus between reviewers. Lastly, we examined each remaining article to categorize its subject area or discipline. Our initial search included a number of systematic reviews outside the health science disciplines, and will yield data that has implications for librarians in the health sciences and in disciplines outside the health sciences field.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-01-22

375-Thumbnail Image.png

Support Online Student Success with Sequenced Interactive Library Modules

Description

Students in three consecutive nursing classes in the online RN-BSN program completed interactive library modules aimed at teaching information literacy skills and database searching in nursing specific resources.
Sequencing library modules over the course of multiple semesters allowed students to

Students in three consecutive nursing classes in the online RN-BSN program completed interactive library modules aimed at teaching information literacy skills and database searching in nursing specific resources.
Sequencing library modules over the course of multiple semesters allowed students to build upon core knowledge that is necessary to successfully complete increasingly advanced assignments and gain research skills that can be applied in their future careers as nurses.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-01-03

How Do Google, Google Scholar, and Other Google Tools Help Health Professionals Navigate the Oceans of Information?

Description

As health information professionals we are familiar with specialized resources such as PubMed and CINAHL but less familiar with general freely available tools such as Google, Google Scholar, and other open Google tools. We wondered:

1. What Google tools are Health

As health information professionals we are familiar with specialized resources such as PubMed and CINAHL but less familiar with general freely available tools such as Google, Google Scholar, and other open Google tools. We wondered:

1. What Google tools are Health Sciences Researchers and Healthcare Professionals using, and how are they using them?
2. How effective are Google and/or Google Scholar for literature searching?
3. What other research is needed in this area?

Methods:
We searched for: ‘Google’ across five health sciences and health sciences related databases (CINAHL, Cochrane, PsycInfo, PubMed, Web of Science) and in Google Scholar (*For Google Scholar we searched: health AND google). We reviewed the first 100 citations from each database and selected results that: 1. Mentioned use of a Google tool, or 2. Discussed the effectiveness of Google or Google Scholar in scholarly literature searching. Out of the second group, we selected and read the 10 most relevant articles discussing the effectiveness of Google and/or Google Scholar for literature searching. We tried out recommended best practices to search for topics we had previously searched only in subject specific databases.

Results:
Health Sciences Researchers and Healthcare Professionals use many Google tools for a variety of purposes. Each tool was used in different ways by authors writing in the Health Sciences (see pie charts and examples in poster). Regarding literature searching the poster includes Google Scholar content sources, Top Search Strategies for Google Scholar, and Considerations for using Google Scholar for literature searching.

Conclusions:
Health Science researchers use a variety of Google tools to gather and manipulate data, and to visualize and disseminate results. Health care professionals use Google tools to facilitate interventions and for interactive educational materials. For Literature searching our results encourage using Google Scholar to complement subject specific databases. Its unique content makes it a valuable resource for finding additional documents.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-07-26

371-Thumbnail Image.png

Finding Consumer Health Information: Resources & Strategies to Alleviate the Pain

Description

Do your library users, friends, or family look to you for help locating reliable, timely, and easy to understand consumer health information? Sifting through the large amounts of health information and misinformation available online can prove difficult for even the

Do your library users, friends, or family look to you for help locating reliable, timely, and easy to understand consumer health information? Sifting through the large amounts of health information and misinformation available online can prove difficult for even the seasoned librarian much less a typical library user. This poster session will discuss the difficulties and potential pitfalls of consumer health reference and share resources and strategies to help improve interactions with consumer health questions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-11-07

368-Thumbnail Image.png

Developing Applied Projects Collections in an Institutional Repository: Challenges & Benefits

Description

While PhD dissertations are typically accessible many other terminal degree projects remain invisible and inaccessible to a greater audience. Over the past year and a half, librarians at Arizona State University collaborated with faculty and departmental administrators across a variety

While PhD dissertations are typically accessible many other terminal degree projects remain invisible and inaccessible to a greater audience. Over the past year and a half, librarians at Arizona State University collaborated with faculty and departmental administrators across a variety of fields to develop and create institutional repository collections that highlight and authoritatively share this type of student scholarship with schools, researchers, and future employers. This poster will present the benefits, challenges, and considerations required to successfully implement and manage these collections of applied final projects or capstone projects. Specifically, issues/challenges related to metadata consistency, faculty buy-in, and developing an ingest process, as well as benefits related to increased visibility and improved educational and employment opportunities will be discussed. This interactive presentation will also discuss lessons learned from the presenter’s experiences in context of how they can easily apply to benefit their respective institutions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05-02