ASU launched an academic partnership in 2018 with the internationally acclaimed light and space artist James Turrell, placing Roden Crater at the center of learning and innovation. Roden Crater is an unprecedented large-scale artwork created within a volcanic cinder cone near Flagstaff in the Painted Desert region of Northern Arizona. Within this volcano, Turrell is sculpting discrete viewing spaces and chambers in which individuals may experience the light from celestial objects and observe the cosmos.

Based in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, ASU’s Roden Crater academic programs aim to provide educational experiences for learners of all ages. Field labs, design studios, internships, and virtual and embodied learning opportunities are designed by faculty working across ASU’s 17 colleges. This archive is dedicated to the preservation of the student projects created in the multi-disciplinary academic programs connected to Roden Crater.  

Collaborating Institutions:
Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts
Displaying 1 - 10 of 24
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Pigments Derived From the Painted Desert

Description

Arizona native minerals.

Spring 2019 Course: Art and Sensory Acuity (taught by Christine Lee)

 

For the course Art and Sensory Acuity, we looked at how our perception and ability to experience a range of sensation can inform the creation of artistic and design based work.

Arizona native minerals.

Spring 2019 Course: Art and Sensory Acuity (taught by Christine Lee)

 

For the course Art and Sensory Acuity, we looked at how our perception and ability to experience a range of sensation can inform the creation of artistic and design based work. We explored perception through the lens of artist James Turrell’s Roden Crater, under which specific materials, environment, and conditions present, shaped our sensory experience. Concurrently we expanded our sensory acuity through engagement with guest speakers ASU Assoc. Professor Patrick Young and Assist. Professor Christy Spackman, Ed Krupp Director of Griffith Observatory, and writer Lawrence Weschler, to develop a deeper sensibility across media, time and space. The resulting sculptural forms/prototypes, performance, and installations were designed and constructed in response to the collective experience.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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Room of Luminant Meaning

Description

Glass, LED, absorptive filter, blackout screen.

Spring 2019 Course: Art and Sensory Acuity (taught by Christine Lee)

For the course Art and Sensory Acuity, we looked at how our perception and ability to experience a range of sensation can inform the creation of artistic and

Glass, LED, absorptive filter, blackout screen.

Spring 2019 Course: Art and Sensory Acuity (taught by Christine Lee)

For the course Art and Sensory Acuity, we looked at how our perception and ability to experience a range of sensation can inform the creation of artistic and design based work. We explored perception through the lens of artist James Turrell’s Roden Crater, under which specific materials, environment, and conditions present, shaped our sensory experience. Concurrently we expanded our sensory acuity through engagement with guest speakers ASU Assoc. Professor Patrick Young and Assist. Professor Christy Spackman, Ed Krupp Director of Griffith Observatory, and writer Lawrence Weschler, to develop a deeper sensibility across media, time and space. The resulting sculptural forms/prototypes, performance, and installations were designed and constructed in response to the collective experience.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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Close up of glass specimen jars

Description

Image depicts nearly ten glass specimen jars, but centers on three in the front. One contains small rocks or pebbles, and the other two contain dried plant matter. Each jaw has a handwritten blue tag tied to the top of

Image depicts nearly ten glass specimen jars, but centers on three in the front. One contains small rocks or pebbles, and the other two contain dried plant matter. Each jaw has a handwritten blue tag tied to the top of the bottle with blue string. 

Spring 2019 Course: Approaches, to Light (Taught by Edward Finn)

Approaches to Light traced the fundamental questions of James Turrell’s work to their origins in philosophy, literature, physics, and art. By engaging with light as a medium for human imagination, we explored the ways in which we make meaning from the physical universe and the aesthetic frames we impose on it. Students created their own artistic expressions of light, landscape, and imagination in the form of physical artifacts, audiovisual experiences, and other vessels of meaning that responded to the work of Turrell and Roden Crater.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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Handmade field notebook, specimen jars with blue tags, and a pair of 3-D glasses

Description

Spring 2019 Course: Approaches, to Light (Taught by Edward Finn)

Approaches to Light traced the fundamental questions of James Turrell’s work to their origins in philosophy, literature, physics, and art. By engaging with light as a medium for human imagination, we

Spring 2019 Course: Approaches, to Light (Taught by Edward Finn)

Approaches to Light traced the fundamental questions of James Turrell’s work to their origins in philosophy, literature, physics, and art. By engaging with light as a medium for human imagination, we explored the ways in which we make meaning from the physical universe and the aesthetic frames we impose on it. Students created their own artistic expressions of light, landscape, and imagination in the form of physical artifacts, audiovisual experiences, and other vessels of meaning that responded to the work of Turrell and Roden Crater.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

163496-Thumbnail Image.jpg

Seven glass specimen jars of different sizes, with handwritten blue tags

Description

Spring 2019 Course: Approaches, to Light (Taught by Edward Finn)

Approaches to Light traced the fundamental questions of James Turrell’s work to their origins in philosophy, literature, physics, and art. By engaging with light as a medium for human imagination, we

Spring 2019 Course: Approaches, to Light (Taught by Edward Finn)

Approaches to Light traced the fundamental questions of James Turrell’s work to their origins in philosophy, literature, physics, and art. By engaging with light as a medium for human imagination, we explored the ways in which we make meaning from the physical universe and the aesthetic frames we impose on it. Students created their own artistic expressions of light, landscape, and imagination in the form of physical artifacts, audiovisual experiences, and other vessels of meaning that responded to the work of Turrell and Roden Crater.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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Suspended Topography

Description

Gator board, LED lights.

Spring 2019 Course: Approaches, to Light (Taught by Edward Finn)

Approaches to Light traced the fundamental questions of James Turrell’s work to their origins in philosophy, literature, physics, and art. By engaging with light as a medium for

Gator board, LED lights.

Spring 2019 Course: Approaches, to Light (Taught by Edward Finn)

Approaches to Light traced the fundamental questions of James Turrell’s work to their origins in philosophy, literature, physics, and art. By engaging with light as a medium for human imagination, we explored the ways in which we make meaning from the physical universe and the aesthetic frames we impose on it. Students created their own artistic expressions of light, landscape, and imagination in the form of physical artifacts, audiovisual experiences, and other vessels of meaning that responded to the work of Turrell and Roden Crater.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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Listening to field tapes on tape recorder

Description

Spring 2019 Course: Approaches, to Light (Taught by Edward Finn)

Approaches to Light traced the fundamental questions of James Turrell’s work to their origins in philosophy, literature, physics, and art. By engaging with light as a medium for human imagination, we

Spring 2019 Course: Approaches, to Light (Taught by Edward Finn)

Approaches to Light traced the fundamental questions of James Turrell’s work to their origins in philosophy, literature, physics, and art. By engaging with light as a medium for human imagination, we explored the ways in which we make meaning from the physical universe and the aesthetic frames we impose on it. Students created their own artistic expressions of light, landscape, and imagination in the form of physical artifacts, audiovisual experiences, and other vessels of meaning that responded to the work of Turrell and Roden Crater.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

Light Field Notes

Description

Glass jars with natural specimens, handmade book (cyanotypes, watercolor paint, paper, colored pencil, vellum, linen thread), single layer screen prints with etched acrylic, postcards of three-dimensional imagery, narrated story and site-specific field recordings on cassette, cassette case with printed image,

Glass jars with natural specimens, handmade book (cyanotypes, watercolor paint, paper, colored pencil, vellum, linen thread), single layer screen prints with etched acrylic, postcards of three-dimensional imagery, narrated story and site-specific field recordings on cassette, cassette case with printed image, cassette player, Quartz crystal radio antenna, labels made of watercolor paper, red-blue glasses, handmade sleeves and boxes.

Spring 2019 Course: Approaches, to Light (Taught by Edward Finn)

Approaches to Light traced the fundamental questions of James Turrell’s work to their origins in philosophy, literature, physics, and art. By engaging with light as a medium for human imagination, we explored the ways in which we make meaning from the physical universe and the aesthetic frames we impose on it. Students created their own artistic expressions of light, landscape, and imagination in the form of physical artifacts, audiovisual experiences, and other vessels of meaning that responded to the work of Turrell and Roden Crater.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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Live Performance in Marston Theater

Description

Spring 2019 Course: Art and Sensory Acuity (taught by Christine Lee)

For the course Art and Sensory Acuity, we looked at how our perception and ability to experience a range of sensation can inform the creation of artistic and design based work. We explored

Spring 2019 Course: Art and Sensory Acuity (taught by Christine Lee)

For the course Art and Sensory Acuity, we looked at how our perception and ability to experience a range of sensation can inform the creation of artistic and design based work. We explored perception through the lens of artist James Turrell’s Roden Crater, under which specific materials, environment, and conditions present, shaped our sensory experience. Concurrently we expanded our sensory acuity through engagement with guest speakers ASU Assoc. Professor Patrick Young and Assist. Professor Christy Spackman, Ed Krupp Director of Griffith Observatory, and writer Lawrence Weschler, to develop a deeper sensibility across media, time and space. The resulting sculptural forms/prototypes, performance, and installations were designed and constructed in response to the collective experience.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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Memory Wave

Description

Acrylic, tactile transducer, wood, mp3.

Spring 2019 Course: Art and Sensory Acuity (taught by Christine Lee)

For the course Art and Sensory Acuity, we looked at how our perception and ability to experience a range of sensation can inform the creation of artistic and design

Acrylic, tactile transducer, wood, mp3.

Spring 2019 Course: Art and Sensory Acuity (taught by Christine Lee)

For the course Art and Sensory Acuity, we looked at how our perception and ability to experience a range of sensation can inform the creation of artistic and design based work. We explored perception through the lens of artist James Turrell’s Roden Crater, under which specific materials, environment, and conditions present, shaped our sensory experience. Concurrently we expanded our sensory acuity through engagement with guest speakers ASU Assoc. Professor Patrick Young and Assist. Professor Christy Spackman, Ed Krupp Director of Griffith Observatory, and writer Lawrence Weschler, to develop a deeper sensibility across media, time and space. The resulting sculptural forms/prototypes, performance, and installations were designed and constructed in response to the collective experience.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019