A collection of scholarly and professional work created by Matthew Harp. Matthew is a Research Data Management Librarian and Director of Research Data Services in ASU Library Technology Services. He has also served as a Liaison Librarian in the ASU Library Engagement and Learning Services STEM Division, as Digital Projects Librarian in Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Services, and was the Digital Library Production Manager producing instructional and outreach media. orcid.org/0000-0001-6136-851X

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Bridging the Gap Through Collaboration: The ASU Library Barrett Honors College Peer Mentor Program

Description

The transforming skills that lead to exceptional academic results are writing and research. While it is the role of academic librarians to provide the appropriate resources to facilitate research, arguably

The transforming skills that lead to exceptional academic results are writing and research. While it is the role of academic librarians to provide the appropriate resources to facilitate research, arguably students are more willing to rely on their fellow students than professional library assistance. At Arizona State University’s Barrett, The Honors College, trained and motivated students are serving as Peer Mentors who assist student research needs without the "stigma" of asking a Librarian for help.

The panel discusses and elucidate components of a student-to-student peer program and cover comprehensive planning aspects of personnel, communication and workflow methodologies, interdisciplinary representation, and competency building activities. They will share training and work protocols, focusing on the evolution of the program from conceptualization through implementation. The presentation is an interactive conversation between the panelists (covering varying aspects and perspectives of the program) and the audience.

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  • 2019-10-31

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Getting to the Core of Services: Considering the Arizona State University Library as a Core Facility

Description

As academic libraries focus on delivering new services in such areas as research data, digital preservation, and data curation, they have begun to explore alternative funding models and approaches to

As academic libraries focus on delivering new services in such areas as research data, digital preservation, and data curation, they have begun to explore alternative funding models and approaches to research. The Arizona State University (ASU) Library in Tempe works with the university's Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development to collaborate and support ASU's researchers at scale. The library's ongoing collaboration and its specialized services, consultations, and training have led it to consider becoming a core facility, a centralized service that would provide consultation and other help to the university's researchers. As a core facility, the library would gain the ability to fund new initiatives and functions that would expand its reach and improve its support for research.

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  • 2019-10

Carlos Montezuma’s Wassaja Newsletter: Access, Engagement, and Collaboration

Description

In 2014/2015, Arizona State University (ASU) Libraries, the Labriola National American Indian Data Center, and the ASU American Indian Studies Department completed an ASU Institute for Humanities Research (IHR) seed

In 2014/2015, Arizona State University (ASU) Libraries, the Labriola National American Indian Data Center, and the ASU American Indian Studies Department completed an ASU Institute for Humanities Research (IHR) seed grant entitled “Carlos Montezuma’s Wassaja Newsletter: Digitization, Access and Context” to digitize all ASU held issues of the newsletter Wassaja Freedom’s Signal for the Indian, which Yavapai activist-intellectual Carlos Montezuma, MD (1866-1923) self-published during 1916-1922. The grant team additionally selected a portion of the ASU Libraries Carlos Montezuma archival collection for digitization to provide a more complete picture of Dr. Carlos Montezuma’s life and work.

The ASU grant team produced a searchable online collection on the ASU Digital Repository and created an online exhibition in conjunction with the IHR Nexus Lab’s Developing Wassaja Project. The Nexus Lab’s role at ASU is to grow the digital humanities through interdisciplinary collaborations bringing together humanities, science, and technology. The Nexus Lab partnered with the grant team to create the Developing Wassaja Project which provided an opportunity for faculty, staff, and students at ASU to engage in electronic publication through web application development.

The resulting web platform, Wassaja: A Carlos Montezuma Project, provides context for this digitized collection and facilitates community interaction, including a partnership with Dr. Montezuma’s home community the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation. In this webcast, Digital Projects Librarian Matthew Harp, Developing Wassaja Project team member Joe Buenker (subject librarian), and grant team member Joyce Martin (librarian and curator of the Labriola National American Indian Data Center) will discuss and demonstrate the resources created and the resulting partnership with the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation. The webcast will focus on identifying collaborators and needed skills to engage in Digital Humanities research and on identifying the stages of a collaborative project.

Participants will gain insight on working directly with diverse communities; overcoming technical limitations of traditional institutional repositories; collaborative strategies with faculty, research centers, and cultural heritage societies; solutions for moving hidden collections into an engaging digital exhibition; integrating digital humanities research and instruction with library curation; and preparing for long term costs and management issues.

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  • 2016-03-23

It Takes a Village: Implementing a Homegrown Solution for Streaming Video Resources

Description

Limited to streaming only those videos a vendor hosted, ASU Libraries sought to expand collection options with a trial project for hosting content locally. Kaltura, was selected as the platform,

Limited to streaming only those videos a vendor hosted, ASU Libraries sought to expand collection options with a trial project for hosting content locally. Kaltura, was selected as the platform, but Kaltura does not work out of the box. This presentation will cover how using Drupal, along with Kaltura, we built a working video hosting solution. The presentation will cover administrative hurdles, stumbling blocks, pitfalls, enhancements, and lessons learned along the way.

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  • 2012-06-25

Implementing Research Discovery Through SHARE

Description

This presentation highlights SHARE’s ongoing initiatives as a free, open data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle. It includes information about the SHARE open technology and

This presentation highlights SHARE’s ongoing initiatives as a free, open data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle. It includes information about the SHARE open technology and the ongoing community contributions. A variety of data set use cases and their implementation will be described to allow others to apply similar tools and techniques to their home institution or organization. SHARE aggregates free, open metadata about scholarship that includes proposals, registrations, data, publications, and more from more than 125 sources including ASU.

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  • 2017-04-19

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The Labriola Center and the Role of ASU Libraries in The Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture, and Community

Description

The Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture, and Community addresses topics and issues across disciplines in the arts, humanities, sciences, and politics. Underscoring Indigenous American experiences

The Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture, and Community addresses topics and issues across disciplines in the arts, humanities, sciences, and politics. Underscoring Indigenous American experiences and perspectives, this Series seeks to create and celebrate knowledge that evolves from an Indigenous worldview that is inclusive and that is applicable to all walks of life.” Professor Simon Ortiz discussed the overall nature of the Series, especially emphasizing the global nature of Indigenous concerns. Joyce Martin and Matthew Harp elaborated on the contributions of the Labriola National American Indian Data Center and ASU Libraries to the Series.

The Labriola Center hosts an informal event in Hayden Library which facilitates close interaction between the featured speaker and audience members. The ASU Libraries records the evening lectures which take place at the Heard Museum and presents both an audio podcast and streaming video of each lecture on the ASU Library Channel webpage. This lecture series provides not only a chance for community discussion at the events themselves, but through the innovative use of technology the ASU Libraries enables additional forums for discussion in blogs and web pages which choose to link to the streaming videos.

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  • 2010-11-17

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Labriola Native American Data Center Kachinas: ASU Libraries Hidden Treasures

Description

Anthropology librarian Juliann Couture and Joyce Martin, curator of the Labriola National American Indian Data Center, looking at the Center's display of unique Hopi Kachina dolls. Four of the kachinas

Anthropology librarian Juliann Couture and Joyce Martin, curator of the Labriola National American Indian Data Center, looking at the Center's display of unique Hopi Kachina dolls. Four of the kachinas (Navan Kachina; Talavi Kachina; Flute Kachina; and Ahöla Kachina) were created by artist, carver, and former ASU employee Tony Dukepoo as a gift to the libraries in 1979. The kachina dolls are on display in the Labriola Center located on the 2nd floor of the Hayden Library on ASU's Tempe campus.

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Date Created
  • 2012